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Does a Low-Cost Divorce Really Exist?

Separating from your spouse can be very economical if you play your cards right.

It can also be very costly if you rush the process and make bad decisions.  Many divorces these days are very long and uncivilized.  Not to mention extremely expensive.  Trying to figure out how much a divorce costs is like asking how much do you spend on your wedding day?  You would like to set a budget but will always go over due to all the little perks along the roller coaster ride.  Where does all the money go?  Well for one we can figure that out right away.  Who is the first person you contact when you know you have agreed to a divorce?  Yes, your attorney is correct.

So, if you are looking to cut those costs or escape them altogether, you luckily have some alternatives.  The easiest and cheapest way of dealing with a divorce is to do all the paperwork and negotiating on your own.  A website like offers both state specific forms and kits to suit your necessary needs.  Included in every one of our divorce form kits is our step-by-step attorney authored divorce form guides to help make filing your divorce not only easy, but to give you the divorce help you may need to fill out our printable divorce forms.

Another inexpensive alternative for those whose divorces are relatively amicable is mediation.  During mediation, the couple agrees to hire a mediator that practices family law to oversee their negotiations.  A mediator can inform you about potential financial and custodial arrangements, and will help to reopen the discussion if things break down.  Trying to find the right mediator can be a task as well.  Take the time to assure you have a mediator whom you like, respect and believe to be qualified to help both of you negotiate that equitable settlement.  By talking to a number of mediators you will not only become clear on which one feels right for you, but you will also familiarize yourself with the process, the topics you’ll need to discuss, the costs associated with mediated divorces and the issues involved in selecting a mediator.

The biggest advantage of using either “Do it yourself Kits” or “Mediation” is to reduce your legal fees and have a much cheaper divorce.  In most cases I am sure anybody going through the process would like to get the divorce settled as quickly and painless as possible.  Getting a divorce can be very messy, both personally and financially.  Do not make the mistake by rushing the process to settle where it may cause you more damage financially.

If you and your spouse cannot come to an agreement and must go to court, there are a few ways to keep the costs low. Remember, turning the courtroom into a battleground will only exhaust your emotions and your finances.  Be sure to pick your battles wisely knowing every time you open your mouth the dollar signs will pop up.  Another way to keep your divorce basic is always make sure you have all the correct information and documents handy.  Always remember, too much documentation is never enough.

Overall, to avoid high cost fees we recommend you visit and take a glimpse of what we have to offer.   We offer downloadable & printable forms and kits where a Low-Cost Divorce really does Exist.

Is it Possible for a Man to get a Cheap Divorce?

This is the one million dollar question for men, and it is not always about the money.

As we all know, most divorce attorneys only care about themselves and their hourly rates.  This usually causes a divorce to drag out for a long period of time.  Depending on where you live, there are some very good alternatives.

If you have $15,000 to $25,000 to throw away, well then take the conventional route and get yourself an attorney.  But, are there other options?  You bet.  So most of your money does not go to an attorney, here are some different choices on how to seek a cheap divorce.

  • Using a good Mediator is a way to spend about one third of the regular cost of a divorce.  A mediator can decrease the cost of a divorce although it will still cost you a good amount of money.  If you have the funds and do not know your divorce rights, this is a route to take.
  • In most cases checking in with your county clerk’s office is another good way to receive information on how to file for  a divorce or how to file for a legal separation until you and your spouse decide what kind of action you will take.  If your assets are high, this may not be a sensible route to take.  If you are a regular Jo blow, the county clerk will lead you in the right direction to obtaining a cheap divorce.  Remember, you are dealing with a government office so don’t expect friendly smiles and courteous assistance.  However,these are your rights.
  • Depending on your state and your situation, there are Online Divorce Kits and divorce websites that assist you in obtaining the correct divorce forms.  Make sure you do some research and that you use a reputable site with customer service such as
  • Divorce Un-bundling.  This allows you and your spouse to maintain control and make decisions on ending the marriage on your own without the help of a neutral third party assisting you.  This includes the filing of any legal forms.  Again, I recommend you research this topic carefully.
  • In just about any state, you can hire a paralegal that will assist you in preparing the documentation necessary to file for a divorce at a much cheaper rate than an attorney.   Using a paralegal is useful when you and your spouse can agree on terms of the divorce.  But if that is already the case, why do you need a paralegal?  Right?
  • A divorce attorney is an option you have if you can afford to pay for your divorce and possibly pay for your spouses’ attorney as well.  An attorney is also good to have if you have large assets, you know your wife is going to play hardball and if you probably don’t want much contact with her.  If an attorney is absolutely necessary, save yourself some money by doing as much work as you can on your own, ask what you can do to save billable hours and explain you do not want to spend much time and money on your divorce.  A good attorney will assist you on this request.

It is not necessary to waste a lot of money on an attorney.  If you can communicate with your spouse and take the time to figure out what you both want, using a cheaper method for a divorce is very possible.  Remember to go online and look for divorce forms already available at

Use a Divorce Kit Today!

My Divorce Documents is one of the most trusted names in divorce documentation online today.  We pride ourselves in creating complete divorce kits that help our customers to file their divorces by offering on site downloadable divorce forms, restraining orders, child support and custody documents, and everything you need to complete our divorce papers, including name change forms.

Our downloadable divorce forms allow you to fill out the papers with our step by step guides in the comfort and security of your home or office when it is convenient for you.

Divorce can be a very frustrating and trying time.  If you and your spouse have come to the conclusion that divorce is the only answer, this kit will not only save you time, but dollars in legal fees and pain.

No-fault divorce is just as it sounds, neither party is at fault.  Some states call no-fault divorce “dissolution.  It simply states that there are “irreconcilable differences” between the two and they wish to terminate the marriage.

In the Do-It-Yourself Kit the following details will be covered for you:

  • Personal property and real estate
  • Child custody, support and visitation
  • Alimony
  • Debts and other obligations
  • Change to former name for the wife
  • Income taxes

Both Spouses Must Agree on the Following:

Both parties must agree entirely on the following listed details or this kit will not work for you.  Legal advice is recommended if you cannot agree on all aspects of ending the marriage.  If you and your spouse can agree entirely on the following few items, you are a perfect fit for this kit:

1) You must meet residency requirements for your state.  In most states, that is 6 to 12 months. The residency requirements for all states are listed in this kit.

2) Both of you must agree on all aspects of ending your marriage.

3) No pregnancy involved.

4) You must know the whereabouts of your spouse. He/she will need to sign the documents later. He/she will not need to appear in court, however, the person filing will.

5) You must be aware that there will be court fees you’ll pay directly to the court when you file. The fees vary in each state vary depending on where you live.  You can find out by contacting your county clerk’s office.

If you are able to agree on these items, it’s possible to save yourself lots of money in legal fees.  If you cannot agree, we suggest you seek legal advice.

Divorce is usually a very trying time, but if you and your spouse have agreed to all matters in regards to ending your marriage, this kit will definitely save time, heartache and hundreds of dollars.  Be sure to go over all situations, even real estate and children.  In addition to the cost of the kit, you will need to pay court fees.  These vary from state to state, even county to county.  You pay these fees directly to the court.  You can contact your county clerks’ office for actual fees.

To begin this low-cost downloadable specific state divorce process, please go to and see what we have to offer you now.

Common Questions of a Divorce!

A divorce is when both husband and wife have decided to separate and go there own way.  This usually takes the form of dividing their previously shared assets between them selves.  Some divorce proceedings become legal disputes over money, property, and child custodial rights.  When a couple cannot reach an agreement, the court will ultimately make those decisions for them, taking a wide range of factors in consideration when concluding a judgment.

In some states, divorce was socially shameful, and was highly discouraged or prevented by the Church and state.  Divorce was only allowed if one party broke certain marital obligations like, adultery, neglect or abuse.  Such marriages are now referred to as a “fault divorce”.   More recently, divorce has returned to its more usual state, by becoming legal, acceptable, and fairly common.  Some statisticians have reported that fewer than one in twenty divorces are contested in a courtroom.  Divorcing couples are usually reaching a settlement either with lawyers, mediation, or privately.  The restrictions on how easily a divorce can be obtained have been significantly lifted with the prevalence of the “no fault” divorce.

A no-fault divorce is a statement by each spouse that their petition to the court for a divorce has been mutually agreed on by both parties.  It attempts to hold neither party responsible for the dissolution of the marriage, and usually, couples reach a settlement over the division of rights and property.  In this case it would be bound by either an agreement between each other or mediation to avoid litigation.  In most states, all divorces require that a reason be given for the state to dissolve the marriage.  With the exception of the no-fault divorce, acceptable reasons include incompatibility between spouses, the existence of irreconcilable differences, or even the most practical description of a breakdown of the marriage.  The property is not necessarily equal in a no-fault divorce, subject to the agreed terms of the divorce, or ruling of the court.

A Summary Divorce in the United States, and some other countries, is the fastest and simplest form of divorce, granted to couples who had a short, inconsequential marriage.  In this case, few shared assets, and an equally low value of private assets.  It is also conditional on there being no child custodial issues, and no home or mortgage.

Commonly cited causes of divorce include:

  • Adultery by either one or both spouses
  • Strains caused by in-law family members
  • Physical and emotional abuse
  • Obsessive compulsions and addictions

It is a commonly held belief that women successfully negotiate the more favorable settlement or judgment more often than men in divorces, and this is actually supported by some surveys.  There is no question that mothers are usually granted the greater portion of custodial time over children compared to fathers.  However, the degree to which this happens has been gradually deceasing during the past decade.

The sharing of parental responsibilities and rights is one of the most important aspects of divorce in general.  These arrangements are always checked and ratified by a court, even where both parents are in agreement.  The ruling of custodial rights is always in favor of the child’s best interest.  In such a legal battle, the court can take a wide number of factors into consideration when deciding how to divide child custody.

With that in mind divorce rates are the highest they’ve been for hundreds of years.  The terms of divorce are becoming more manageable and acceptable to all involved.

On that note if you would like to begin your process of a divorce.  Simply go to and purchase your do-it-yourself specific state divorce kit and begin your process today.

Steps for Filing for Divorce

Every state has a specific process to get a divorce.

Some states prefer to use the terms “dissolution of marriage”, rather then the word “divorce”.  Although relatively the same definition.  Below are a few steps to filing a divorce.

First Step: Communicating with your Spouse

An irate bitter divorce will only lead to a longer and more expensive one.  If you and your spouse are able to come to an agreement between the division of your marital property and the custody of any children, the divorce will be less difficult then those matters in a dispute.  Majority of couples are not fortunate enough to go into an “uncontested divorce”, and will have to go through the “contested divorce” proceedings in the courtroom.

Second Step: Discussing the Division of your Assets and Property

Each individual state will divide both parties property obtaining during their marriage.  Every state allows each party to determine how the property should be split.  If the two cannot come to an agreement, the judge will then split the property.  Most states have either “community property” or “equitable distribution” divisions.  In community property states the marital property and assets will be divided equally.  A court does not have the authority to base off of income, wealth or other contribution to the marriage.  In an equitable distribution state, a spouse is entitled to a portion of the marital property to their contribution to the marriage.  This means both financial and non-financial elements of the marriage such as raising children and taking care of the home.

Step Three:  Consult a Lawyer

State law governs multiple items related to a divorcing couple such as grounds for divorce, marital property and if a couple is legally separated for any duration of time before the divorce may be granted.

Step Four:  Know your state grounds for divorce

Some states allow a “no fault” divorce where the parties do not have to have a reason for divorce beyond irreconcilable differences.  If your state requires “fault” before the divorce can be granted, there may only be specific grounds which you are legally entitled to a divorce.  A few examples of a fault divorce are adultery, abuse etc.

Step Five: File for Legal Separation

Some states require that couples be separated for a certain amount of time before a divorce may be awarded.  Some states only require that a couple live apart from each other for a specific amount of time.  Some other states require filing a notice of the separation which the court as well.  All requirements will have to be met before a court will accept a divorce application.

Step Six: Be sure to gather all Financial Information

In a divorce the spouse’s assets and debts will be split.  When a divorce petition is filed, most states require a detailed financial data to help the judge determine child or spousal support orders if this may apply.

Step Seven: File the Petition for Divorce

If you choose to hire a lawyer, it is best you have him there representing you.  Some jurisdictions may have different forms for your divorce based on your divorce situation.  If you do not have an attorney this is the information that you most likely will be required to provide for the court:

-Present both yourself and your spouse

-Name and ages of any children that you have and current resident status

-Identify all martial property and debts and your individual income and assets.

When the petition is filed most states require the plaintiff provide three or more copies of the petition and summons.  A summons is a court requiring a party to answer a complaint and appear before the court.  The clerk will then stamp all copies and give you back two, one for yourself and one copy for you to serve on your spouse.

Step Eight: Pay the Court Costs

When a petition is filed the clerk will require that you pay the appropriate court fees.  If you are indigent you may ask the court to waive the fees, which may be included on the complaint form or may require a separate form.

Step Nine: Serve Your Spouse the Divorce Papers

The party who files a court action is responsible for serving the other parties to the lawsuit.  Serving the other party means giving them a physical copy of the petition you filed as well as the summons.  In most states you may serve the other party through the mail or by having another person serve the defendant in person.  In some jurisdictions you may pay a fee to have the Sheriff serve the opposing party for you.  Most states do not allow a plaintiff to personally serve a defendant.

Step Ten:  Provide the Court with Proof of Service

After the defendant has been served most states require the plaintiff submit a “proof of service” with the court.  In this document the person who served the defendant must attest to the service, how and when the party was served.  The proof of service may be a part of the petition or may be a separate form.

Due to divorces being complex and emotional events, most parties have an attorney represent them.  The other option would be to try a do-it-yourself divorce process.   If you decide to try this process you can begin by simply going to and purchase your specific state down-loadable forms and kit.

Stages of a Divorce!

One of life’s most difficult decisions to make is if you should end a marriage or not.  Many people are unsure as to whether they will pursue a divorce or want to understand the process for acquiring one.  Knowledge is empowering and can help you think more clearly as to how you wish to handle the issues within your marriage.  This article gives a general overview of the stages of a divorce case.

In some cases you may not automatically want to file your Divorce Complaint, although there may be reasons you wish to do so.  In this case you may want to try and resolve the issues that are relevant to considering ending your marriage.  If you have come to the final decision of moving forward with a divorce and feel there is no hope left then you need to start your divorce process.  During this time, you will likely exchange whatever information needed to have disclosure on financial issues.  You can even work with mediators or care professionals, if necessary, in order to resolve any conflicts with regard to custody and parenting time of your children.  Once the settlement is reached, it is reduced to writing and executed by the parties and counsel.  At this time, the parties can file the pleadings to obtain a divorce and seek enforcement of the agreement they have reached.

In the event that the circumstances of your case force you to file your divorce pleadings immediately rather than pursue pre-filing settlement options as discussed above, then your case will proceed differently.  The filing of the Divorce Complaint has an important impact.  Generally speaking, it establishes the termination date of your marriage and is the date by which assets of a marriage are identified and valued.  The filing of the Divorce Complaint also triggers many court deadlines for moving your case forward.  For example, your spouse will have thirty-five days to respond to the pleading that you filed.  From there, you and your spouse will prepare financial disclosure forms called Case Information Statements.  These forms will be filed with the court.

You will also begin a process called “discovery” in which you and your spouse will have a certain fixed period of time to respond to formal requests for information. These demands are called “Interrogatories,” which are written questions, to which you must respond, and a “Notice to Produce,” or a demand for documents, to which you will also have to respond by producing the documents requested in the demand.  Depositions may also occur during this discovery period.  Depositions consist of a series of questions that you and your spouse answer under oath. The attorney representing your spouse asks you the questions; your attorney questions your spouse.  Furthermore, if there are contested issues of custody and parenting time and/or if there are assets that need to be valued, such as real estate or a business, those evaluations occur during this time period with the assistance of experts.

Once discovery is completed there are certain initiatives organized by the court to assist you in trying to reach a settlement of your case.  One such initiative is called Early Settlement Panel, where approximately two attorneys volunteer their time to sit as panelists and hear from your counsel the merits of your positions in your divorce.  At the conclusion of that presentation, the panelists will offer a non-binding and confidential assessment of how they would resolve your case based on their experience.  If your case does not settle at Early Settlement Panel, then you are provided the opportunity to go on to Economic Mediation.  During Economic Mediation, attorneys who are qualified mediators volunteer approximately two hours of their time to again hear from you and your counsel and try to help you reach a resolution of your open issues.  With both Early Settlement Panel and Economic Mediation, your spouse and his/her attorney also present their position. At the conclusion of Economic Mediation you report back to the judge assigned to your case to advise the court of the status of your case.  If at the end of Economic Mediation your case is still not settled, then the court will likely schedule an in-court settlement conference and/or a trial date.

The above offers a quick summary of the general process of a divorce.  Subjective circumstances of an individual case can certainly cause a case to evolve in a variety of different directions.  A complicated custody dispute can also make a divorce more involved, although courts do prioritize custody matters and try to expedite those cases, preferably within a six month period of time tolling from the filing date of the Complaint for Divorce.  It is also important to keep in mind that with the assistance of counsel and cooperation from the parties, even complicated matters can be solved expeditiously.  Every divorce varies according to your situation.

If you have read the divorce process and realize that you can have an amicable divorce and come to agreements to resolve this divorce quickly.  Then I encourage you to simply go to where you can download your specific state low cost forms and kits today.

Rights of My Property During a Divorce!

Division of property is usually part of the divorce process.

Here are some legal terms and concepts that are good to know when speaking to an attorney.

Before speaking to an attorney, it is helpful to become familiar with a few legal concepts and legal terms such as:

  • Division of Property
  • Community Property
  • Separate Property
  • Equitable Distribution.

People should consult a family law attorney early in the divorce process as this may preserve an individual’s financial well being. Keep note that this article does not constitute legal advice.

While internet research is helpful, everyone should understand that each state has different divorce laws and legal terms.. There are, however, basic similarities in divorces, and though the terminology may be different, the basic principles in the divorce process are relatively uniform.

Division of Property

In simple terms, community property can be thought of as “all property and profits acquired during marriage.  Yet, there are other factors which can affect whether or not something really is community property.

In a short-term marriage, with no children and little community property, it can often be easy to obtain a quick divorce.

However, long-term marriages can often bring more complex issues into the divorce, such as:

  • Personal Property (jewelry, clothing, cars, and other things)
  • Real estate
  • Children
  • Businesses
  • Large or concealed debts
  • Trust funds
  • Investments
  • Pensions
  • Joint and separate accounts

In complex situations, a husband and wife may be unable to agree upon a division of assets without the help of a divorce specialist who deals with these issues on a daily basis.

Equitable Distribution of Community Property

Equitable distribution means a “fair” distribution.  Many states start with the presumption that “equitable means equal” but “other factors may contribute to an unequal distribution that is still considered equitable.

Though every state has their own divorce laws, many states consider factors like the following when making a fair division of community property assets:

  • How many years the couple has been married
  • Prenuptial agreements
  • Ability of each person (usually the wife) to earn their own living after the divorce
  • Age and health
  • What each person has contributed to the marriage
  • Tax consequences of the division
  • Debts and liabilities

There are many other considerations that may affect distribution.

Separate Property

What is separate property? Separate property is any asset that is owned by just one spouse and is usually not divided between the spouses during the divorce process.

Sometimes, separate property becomes co-owned and might be considered community property.  Divorce lawyers will be able to explain these special circumstances.

Few Examples of Separate Property:

  • Gift or Inheritance given to one spouse
  • Personal injury settlements given to one spouse
  • Things that were owned by one spouse before the marriage, such as a business, a home, or a pension
  • Property purchased during the marriage by one spouse with their own (separate) money

When large assets, debts, or children are involved, it is important that each spouse has their own attorney to represent their interests.

Other Division of Property Issues

Division of property involves the distribution of money and other assets associated with the time span of the marriage.

Here are some of the other issues that must be settled during the divorce process, but are related to life after divorce:

  • Alimony or spousal support
  • Child custody and visitation
  • Child support payments

It is important for each spouse to retain a rational and businesslike temperament throughout the divorce process. There are always many compromises which must be made on the part of both the husband and the wife.

Understanding some of the terms and concepts associated with division of assets may make the divorce process easier for everyone.

Keep in mind if you and your spouse are able to have an amicable divorce and can come to an agreement on your own.  I highly recommend you visit and download a low-cost specific state do it yourself kit and forms.

Know your Facts of a Divorce!

Divorce is very painful and can be an extremely difficult process.  Knowing how divorce laws function and understanding the court’s role in a divorce can help to make this transition smoother and easier.

Divorce laws govern the dissolution of a marriage.  Every country has its own laws regarding divorce and, in fact, divorce laws can vary from state to state or province to province within a nation.  Knowing your jurisdiction’s divorce laws can keep a bad situation from becoming worse, and save you future turmoil.

In the United States, divorce laws, in general, provide two basic forms of divorce: fault and no-fault divorce.  However, even in some jurisdictions whose divorce laws do not require a party to claim fault of their partner, a court may still take into account the behavior of the parties when dividing property, debts, evaluating custody, and support.

In a no-fault divorce, the dissolution of a marriage does not require a reason or proof of fault of either party.  Forty-nine states have adopted no-fault divorce laws, with grounds for divorce including incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, and irremediable breakdown of the marriage.  New York is the sole exception divorce laws there still require a proof of fault.

Studies show that about 95 percent of divorces in the United States are “uncontested,” because the two parties are able to work out an arrangement concerning property, debt, children and support issues.  When the parties can agree and present the court with a fair and equitable agreement, approval of the divorce is almost guaranteed.  If the parties can’t work out their differences, divorce laws govern the fair and equitable disposition of these issues.

Divorce laws generally recognize two types of property during property division proceedings – marital property and separate property.  Marital property consists of property that the spouses acquire individually or jointly during the course of marriage.  Under divorce laws, separate property represents any property that one spouse purchased and possessed prior to the marriage and that did not substantially change in value during the course of the marriage because of the efforts of one or both spouses.  Under new divorce laws, separate property is returned to its original owner, while marital property is divided according to negotiated settlement and what the court deems equitable.

In cases involving children, divorce laws attempt to ensure the matter does not spill over into the family court system.  In many jurisdictions, divorce laws require divorcing parents to submit a parenting plan documenting out each party’s rights and responsibilities.

Divorce laws also provide for the establishment of alimony, often depending on the length of the marriage and other factors.  Spousal support is becoming less common, however, as more women are entering the workforce and earning their own income.

With this in mind if you and your spouse are able to come to an agreement and you wish to save money and time simply go to and begin your low cost specific state divorce process now.

Organization Tips for a Divorce!

Once you have made the final decision to get a divorce, attached are some tips you can do to prepare for a divorce.

1) Take Note

You will need to use your own money for divorce, not your spouses.  You will have to maintain yourself and your children for a while if you are dependent on your spouse and your spouse makes the decision to cut you off support.

You will also probably need funds to hire a lawyer.  If there is anyway to begin a separate account to guard against future financial possibilities, now is the time to do it.  If you need to borrow money from a relative or friend, be sure to sign a promissory note so the court will look at this as a loan that you have to repay and not as a gift.

2) Log a Divorce Calendar

If you are currently using a desk calendar or day planner, you will now need to include your divorce events.  There will be meetings with your lawyer and court deadlines to keep track of.  It may be helpful to keep track of discussions with your spouse.

A divorce Calendar may be used as evidence in your case when your spouse does not keep an appointment or violated an agreement or court order.  Visitation dates with children need to be calendared.  You will also want to keep track of appointments with your children’s teachers, doctors, coaches and tutors.  This may become evidence of your participation in your children’s lives in your divorce.

3) Create a To Do List

Be sure to stay organized and set your priorities straight during the divorce.  This is the easiest way to do it.  List all the items you have to accomplish and mark them off as you go through them.

4) Prepare a Divorce Folder or Binder

A divorce produces a lot of paperwork and may become a storm.  The simplest way to keep track of all these papers is with a three ring binder and a three-hole punch.  Put papers in chronological order and be sure to make an index for your own benefit.

5) Set up a Divorce File

You may prefer to set up individual files for various categories of divorce papers.   Some examples are correspondence with your attorney, drafts of agreements, financial information and pleadings.  Files with brads and a two hole punch will help you keep papers neat and organized.

6) Cut Expenses

If you have debt in your name, like credit cards or student loans, you will want to pay those debts down as much as possible before a divorce.  If your family is like most American families, you have been spending close to your entire income, if not more, and when one household becomes two, there will not be enough money to pay the expenses of both unless something changes.

You may have to cut your current expenses, sell the car and get a less expensive model, or maybe sell the house.  If your spouse does not voluntarily support you and the children, your remedy is to ask the Court to order support.  You will not have a good prediction of any of this and you will not know the answers for sure until the agreement is signed or the judge makes a ruling.  But, the point is to think about it, and identify problems and possible solutions. Then take the actions that you can take and avoid missteps.

7) Stay with a Consistent Routine

It will help if you try to keep things as normal as possible in your life.  Do not skip meals or change sleeping habits.  Positive routines like using you’re to do list and calendar will help you keep focus.  Exercise is always a great way to relieve stress.  Try to maintain friendships and daily routines as normal.

8) Be Constructive

Try to maintain a positive outlook and do not let yourself get involved with unnecessary conflicts with your spouse.  You will need his signature on a settlement agreement before your divorce is over.  You will still be parents together for years after the divorce.

9) Make a Plan

Take it one day at a time.  Focus on the present and not the past.  Try to control only those things within your control.  Many things in a divorce are outside of your control.  Try not to blow those things out of proportion.  Make a plan. Then keep working your plan.  That is how you will take control of your divorce and not let it take control of you.

10) Gather Financial Information

The more you can organize your own financial documents, the more you will reduce your attorney fees and improve your chances of success.  You are going to have to gather and organize a lot of information for your attorney or your case.  A good way of organizing the information you find is a financial statement which can be used as a checklist.

Many courts have a form financial statement available at the court clerk’s office and sometimes online. If you can obtain this form and fill it out, it will help you gather and organize your financial information.  Give it to your lawyer at the first meeting to save time and expense.

11) Do Your Research

It is valuable for you to learn everything you can about divorce early in the process.  If you know little or nothing about the process, you may not make the best decisions or choices.  Most people are uncomfortable with the unknown. You can raise your comfort level and your odds of success by finding out what is going to happen before it happens. The Internet is a convenient way to obtain summary and detailed information about divorce.

Of course there are other ways to research the subject.  You can start your research at a library or bookstore.  There are seminars and support groups.  Talk to friends who have been through divorce.  But, keep in mind that every divorce is different. It’s a good idea to learn about the basics of divorce law in your state early in the process.

With this is mind, if you and your spouse are able to come to an agreement without any hassle you are able to do an online divorce with a do it yourself specific state divorce process.  You can begin this low cost process by simply going to and begin your easy and quick divorce today.

A Few Tips on Divorce!

1.  Safety First

First basic steps are to try and keep yourself and your family safe.  If you are in a situation where safety is an issue, be sure to contact the police and immediately consult with a lawyer.

2. If you are looking to seek full custody of your children do not leave the residence without the kids

If you do not take your children with you when you leave, you may most likely lose the chance of seeking full custody of your kids.

3. Consult with a family law attorney if necessary

If you have made your final decision to divorce then you may want to consult with attorney to get more information on the proper steps to take for the divorce process.  Keep in mind that consulting with an attorney involves legal fees and expenses.  Be sure to ask the attorney immediately on specific charges.

4. Even if your spouse requests that you move out of the family residence, you have the right to stay

Maybe you should suggest that your spouse move out of the residence if she or he wants to be separated so badly.

5. Play Fair

Keeping a civil relationship with your spouse is very important.  Do not go and play games with disconnecting or canceling memberships or accounts.  It is very important to realize the same judicial officer will most likely be presiding over your face from start to finish.  You want that judicial officer to respect you.  If you do not play fair, the judicial officer in your case will remember that you were unreasonable and this may affect determinations of future decisions regarding custody, support, etc.

6. Do not fight over objects that have no real sentimental reasons just because

Unless you are fighting over an heirloom or something that is irreplaceable, ask yourself how much the attorney’s fees and emotional grief will cost you, and determine if it would be less expensive to purchase a new or used item.

7. Documents

At the official meeting with an attorney if you decide to use one you are asked to provide accurate information and documentation.  The faster you obtain this information, the faster they will be able to proceed with your dissolution.  If they are required to obtain documents through formal discovery, it will be expensive.  If you do not have bank records, order them.  If the accountant has your taxes, obtain the copies and get them to to the attorney’s office.

8.  Acknowledge your feelings / Consider Counseling

Divorce can be a very difficult time.  Be sure to acknowledge this fact.  If you find that your decisions regarding custody and visitation and/or property division are made out of anger, try and seek some counseling immediately.  The quicker you handle your emotions, the faster you will be healthy and can be a better parent and person.
9. Photograph your possessions

If you fear that your spouse may take your possessions, photograph them to show their condition and value.

Attached were just a few tips for you to know going into a divorce.  Now if you and your spouse are able to come to an agreement and make decision together then hiring an attorney is unnecessary.  Today most divorcing couples are taking the opportunity to do there own divorce.  You can find out more information by simply going to to begin your low cost do it yourself online divorce today.