Mississippi Divorce Law

Complete Overview of of the Mississippi Divorce Laws

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Mississippi Divorce Law

Important Mississippi Divorce Guidelines to File for a Divorce

Mississippi Residency Requirements For Divorce

Either the petitioner or respondent must have been a resident of Mississippi for at least six months before filing Mississippi divorce forms.

Grounds For Divorce In Mississippi

There is one no-fault grounds for divorce in Mississippi:

  • irreconcilable differences.

The following are some of the fault grounds for divorce in Mississippi:

  • adultery;
  • impotence;
  • alcoholism/Substance abuse;
  • cruel and inhuman treatment;
  • willful desertion for one year.
Mississippi Child Custody

Joint or sole custody may be awarded in accordance with the best interests of the child. Joint legal custody gives both parents the right to participate in making decisions concerning the child’s development and well being. Sole legal custody gives only one parent the right to participate in making decisions concerning the child’s development and well being.

Mississippi Child Support Guidelines

Unless special circumstances are present, the courts calculate child support based on the official child support guidelines. Child support will continue until the child reaches adulthood, and may be extended through his or her secondary education.

Generally, a non custodial parent can expect to pay approximately 14% of his or her adjusted gross income as support for one child. That amount increases to 24% for four children.

Venue

For a no-fault divorce, Mississippi divorce forms may be filed in the petitioner’s or respondent’s county of residence. For a fault-based divorce, Mississippi divorce forms may be filed in the county in which the spouses last resided together, in the non-Mississippi county the petitioner resides, or in the Mississippi county the respondent resides.

Mediation

Before or after the Mississippi divorce forms are filed, the parties may agree to submit their disputed issues to mediation. If an agreement is reached, the parties can then proceed in court on an uncontested basis.