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Do Men And Women Handle New Divorce Differently?

complete case reviewOn Reddit, a poster recently asked the question as to whether men and women behave differently immediately following the decision to divorce. 

“Men generally don’t wait as long to get back on the dating scene … Women [lean] towards taking more time to ‘learn how to be alone’ … Does this seem to ring true to people?”

Other Redditors found the generalization to be too broad. “I completely disagree,” said one commenter. “I think the defining factor is who ended the marriage. The person who wanted the divorce is usually the one who moves on quicker. He or she has already processed that the marriage is over before the other spouse even finds out.” 

As an online divorce review site that has experience in communicating with our readership, this response rings true to us as well. Going one further, however, our statistics show that women tend to end the marriage 64 percent of the time, meaning that it’s usually the female in a heterosexual relationship who moves on first. 

If you’re the person who is ready to move on, it’s pretty simple to do so. If you’re left wondering what happened, however, it’s another story. It’s during this time period that the following advice is the most helpful. 

Don’t assume that your ex will come back to you. 

Could it happen? Yes. Will it happen? Likely, no. That’s because getting a divorce is a big decision and people don’t go to the trouble of it unless they’re sure. The best thing you can do for your mental and physical health is to treat it like what it is: the end of your marriage. The sooner you realize this, the easier it will be to move on. 

If you and your spouse have agreed to go through with a divorce but you’re not sure where to turn in getting an attorney or doing it yourself, check out our online divorce reviews to see which path is right for you, and to learn the top services that will meet your needs.

Cheap Divorce: The Best Ways To Control Your Costs

No one ever says that divorce is inexpensive, and that’s part of the reason why couples end up spending thousands of dollars. However, it doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg. As an online divorce review site, we know this because we see viable options from both DIY and attorney standpoints in the websites that we cover. With that in mind, we’ve put together our list of the best ways to control your costs throughout a divorce.

One: Learn about filing costs.

If you and your spouse are on a budget and you would like to get through the divorce as cheaply as possible, then you must first be aware of ALL costs associated with the divorce. Whether you use an attorney or a DIY service, this is a bill you’ll have to pay. We recommend going down to your local courthouse to see what the filing fees are. If you’re a little savvier, then you can probably find the costs on the court website or in with the forms that you will find on a DIY service — see this My Divorce Papers review for more details.

Two: Decide the best option — DIY vs. Attorney.

Many people are intimidated by the thought of handling the divorce themselves, and that’s fine if not a bit unnecessary. Sites like My Divorce Papers (referenced above) have a guided, step-by-step approach that allow you to complete all the necessary paperwork in under an hour. Still, if you’re intent on finding an attorney to handle your case, there are other websites that you’ll find in our online divorce reviews that offer attorney referral services. That way you won’t spend all day looking for a competent and affordable attorney.

Three: Get Along.

The reason why most divorces get out of control have little to do with attorneys or forms confusion and everything to do with couples who fight over everything. One couple even made the news recently for spending 18 years in litigation over their divorce. Eighteen years! If you can both learn compromise and respect, you can get through the divorce even if you seriously don’t like one another.

Follow the three steps listed above, and your divorce won’t cost you nearly as much as you’re worried that it might. Good luck!

Advice To Newlyweds From Actual Divorced People

Our online divorce review site features a number of resources for people looking for a hassle-free divorce, but occasionally we also feature wisdom from actual divorcees, and that’s what we’d like to share today.

Recently on reddit, a poster asked this question of divorcees: “What advice would you offer newly weds that you wish you knew when you got married?”

Here are some of our favorite responses.

1. “Don’t get married because you’ve been together X number of years and it’s the next step. Don’t get married because you just finished college/ grad school/ med school/ law school and it’s probably time. Don’t get married because your friends are and it feels like you should too. Get married because you love your partner and want to work, sacrifice, comprimise, hold your tongue, sympathize, support, empathize, and fight for your marriage.”

2. “Don’t get married because she is pregnant and it is the ‘right thing to do.’”

3. “Think hard about it, but don’t take to heart that once it’s done, you two will ALWAYS be together. Stay your own self; the only person you will always be with, forever, is YOU.”

4. “Learn how to communicate right away. Be able to listen and be able to talk about what you need. Women need to respect their men and men need to show their wives they love them. Read books from the start about marriage. ‘The five love languages’ by Gary Chapman is a great start! Make sure you establish your roles. Don’t talk crap about your spouse to your family, if you have a problem you can confide in them, but don’t run to them every time your spouse messes up. Learn how to work through problems without anger. Don’t be controlling! Don’t let your own insecurities ruin a great thing. Always…. ALWAYS be your spouse’s friend, meaning don’t treat your friends better than you would your spouse. Work together, not against each other if there are problems. You won’t always agree, understand it and be flexible. Learn to compromise, learn to apologize and always forgive. Don’t stop having sex, don’t stop being vulnerable, don’t stop flirting. If you wouldn’t want it done to you, don’t do it to them. Be transparent!! No lies! No cheating! If it happens, you can work it out. Always remember what brought you together.”

5. “Don’t get married because of outside pressure of any kind — any two idiots can get married but it takes two mature, giving, empathetic individuals to stay married, happily or otherwise.”

Newlyweds, to ensure you don’t end up back on this page looking at our online divorce reviews a few years from now, take the above advice to heart, and make well thought out decisions.

20 Percent Of Married People Are Harboring A Huge Secret [Survey]

As an online divorce review site, we try to also stay on top of the latest research from around the globe as it relates to marriage and divorce. One of the latest studies to come out of Britain surveyed 2,175 British citizens, and found that one in five are harboring a secret from their spouses. 

The survey, conducted by UK family law firm Slater & Gordon, found that 20 percent said they were keeping a major secret in their marriage. About 25 percent of those people worried that the secret was so big, it could end their marriage.

“There is often a perception that marriages come to an end because of lots of little things coming to a head over time,” said Amanda McAlister, head of family law at Slater & Gordon, in a press release. “But we find that a high proportion of clients come to us having been in a happy marriage just weeks earlier. It’s normally the case that one lie or one secret is the undoing of the whole marriage.”

Secrets include the following: 

  • Money troubles
  • Pornography
  • Infidelity
  • Contact with a former partner and past relationships
  • Infidelity

As for the length of time that these individuals kept the secret from their spouses, an astounding 25 percent said the major secret had been kept from their spouse for at least 25 years, while about 12 percent said they had taken extreme action to ensure the secret wasn’t revealed. Finally, 28 percent believed that coming out with the secret now would make things much worse.

McAlister, however, believes this may be a misconception, stating, “My advice to anyone is to try and be as honest as possible with your partner. Most people want to be married and in my experience, couples are often more hurt by the lies covering up a mistake than a mistake in the first place.”

If your marriage has been rocked by a secret you can’t get past, and you want to know the best sites to handle the divorce yourself, allow our online divorce reviews site to help you find the right place to handle your case.

Is it Possible for a Man to get a Cheap Divorce?

This is the one million dollar question for men, and it is not always about the money.

As we all know, most divorce attorneys only care about themselves and their hourly rates.  This usually causes a divorce to drag out for a long period of time.  Depending on where you live, there are some very good alternatives.

If you have $15,000 to $25,000 to throw away, well then take the conventional route and get yourself an attorney.  But, are there other options?  You bet.  So most of your money does not go to an attorney, here are some different choices on how to seek a cheap divorce.

  • Using a good Mediator is a way to spend about one third of the regular cost of a divorce.  A mediator can decrease the cost of a divorce although it will still cost you a good amount of money.  If you have the funds and do not know your divorce rights, this is a route to take.
  • In most cases checking in with your county clerk’s office is another good way to receive information on how to file for  a divorce or how to file for a legal separation until you and your spouse decide what kind of action you will take.  If your assets are high, this may not be a sensible route to take.  If you are a regular Jo blow, the county clerk will lead you in the right direction to obtaining a cheap divorce.  Remember, you are dealing with a government office so don’t expect friendly smiles and courteous assistance.  However,these are your rights.
  • Depending on your state and your situation, there are Online Divorce Kits and divorce websites that assist you in obtaining the correct divorce forms.  Make sure you do some research and that you use a reputable site with customer service such as www.mydivorcedocuments.com.
  • Divorce Un-bundling.  This allows you and your spouse to maintain control and make decisions on ending the marriage on your own without the help of a neutral third party assisting you.  This includes the filing of any legal forms.  Again, I recommend you research this topic carefully.
  • In just about any state, you can hire a paralegal that will assist you in preparing the documentation necessary to file for a divorce at a much cheaper rate than an attorney.   Using a paralegal is useful when you and your spouse can agree on terms of the divorce.  But if that is already the case, why do you need a paralegal?  Right?
  • A divorce attorney is an option you have if you can afford to pay for your divorce and possibly pay for your spouses’ attorney as well.  An attorney is also good to have if you have large assets, you know your wife is going to play hardball and if you probably don’t want much contact with her.  If an attorney is absolutely necessary, save yourself some money by doing as much work as you can on your own, ask what you can do to save billable hours and explain you do not want to spend much time and money on your divorce.  A good attorney will assist you on this request.

It is not necessary to waste a lot of money on an attorney.  If you can communicate with your spouse and take the time to figure out what you both want, using a cheaper method for a divorce is very possible.  Remember to go online and look for divorce forms already available at www.mydivorcedocuments.com

Important Steps to Divorce!

DIVORCE PREPARATION – CRUCIAL INITIAL STEPS

Planning

The planning of a divorce can be very difficult.  Be completely sure that you are 100% that you want a divorce before getting started.  Giving up on your marriage can be very overwhelming.  Be sure you have explored other resources such as marriage counseling or communication exercises before you commit to a divorce.  If possible, you and your spouse should work together and do your best to save your marriage before making any drastic decisions.

If all fails and you still are certain regarding the decision then, it is time to tell your spouse.  You must be prepared for the outcome, this can be the most emotional and difficult conversation you may ever have.  Get support from your family and friends and have them ready in case you are concerned your spouse may have a reaction that could lead to danger to either you or your children.  Be honest and upfront unless there is a security or custodial related need to not do so.

Inform your children.  If both parents can do this together, an honest explanation will provide reassurance and support to the children.  Consider researching other educational resources that will assist you to understand how to best communicate these difficult news.  It is recommended to do this before announcing the divorce to your children.

Records

Gathering records is very important.  You will need to try and gather as many official copies of financial information about your spouse as possible.  This information can be legal, government, joint assets, joint debts, income records, employment records, insurance information and credit reports.  For your children, gather birth dates, current and past address records and social security numbers.

Obtain proof of ownership on all joint and personal assets and records of all joint debts.  Get copies of past tax returns, marriage license and any existing prenuptial agreements.

All of this information will be necessary when applying for a divorce either through an attorney or if you are using a “do it yourself kit”.

Divorce Preparation

You will need to decide if you are going to use an attorney or if you are going to use other methods to file for a divorce.  Divorce documents are available online and are a great way to keep costs low.  There are educational resources to assist you in understanding a divorce process.  You can look into other media such as MyDivorceDocuments.com, books, DVD’s or pamphlets to help you prepare for your divorce.  Take time to understand each step of the divorce process.

Custody arrangements are very important so begin to keep track of the time you spend with your children.  Make sure you log in all efforts in taking care of your children.

Prepare for a life apart

Speak to your spouse about all the accounts, debts and assets you share.  Make sure you close all credit accounts and joint bank accounts as early as possible.  Be sure to close all accounts in writing.  Speak to a professional about the negotiation process of dividing debts and assets.  Apply for your own credit cards and open your own bank accounts.  If needed, update your last will and testament as early as possible.

Use the address of your new residence or establish a secondary mailing address.  If sharing a home with your spouse for some time, store and save any sensitive information separately without access from your spouse.

A divorce does not have to be a difficult and stressful time.  Make sure to prepare and educate yourself in the initial steps to begin the divorce process.  By simply going to www.mydivorcedocuments.com you can find several forms and kits as well as information to help you start your divorce process.

Use a Divorce Kit Today!

My Divorce Documents is one of the most trusted names in divorce documentation online today.  We pride ourselves in creating complete divorce kits that help our customers to file their divorces by offering on site downloadable divorce forms, restraining orders, child support and custody documents, and everything you need to complete our divorce papers, including name change forms.

Our downloadable divorce forms allow you to fill out the papers with our step by step guides in the comfort and security of your home or office when it is convenient for you.

Divorce can be a very frustrating and trying time.  If you and your spouse have come to the conclusion that divorce is the only answer, this kit will not only save you time, but dollars in legal fees and pain.

No-fault divorce is just as it sounds, neither party is at fault.  Some states call no-fault divorce “dissolution.  It simply states that there are “irreconcilable differences” between the two and they wish to terminate the marriage.

In the Do-It-Yourself Kit the following details will be covered for you:

  • Personal property and real estate
  • Child custody, support and visitation
  • Alimony
  • Debts and other obligations
  • Change to former name for the wife
  • Income taxes

Both Spouses Must Agree on the Following:

Both parties must agree entirely on the following listed details or this kit will not work for you.  Legal advice is recommended if you cannot agree on all aspects of ending the marriage.  If you and your spouse can agree entirely on the following few items, you are a perfect fit for this kit:

1) You must meet residency requirements for your state.  In most states, that is 6 to 12 months. The residency requirements for all states are listed in this kit.

2) Both of you must agree on all aspects of ending your marriage.

3) No pregnancy involved.

4) You must know the whereabouts of your spouse. He/she will need to sign the documents later. He/she will not need to appear in court, however, the person filing will.

5) You must be aware that there will be court fees you’ll pay directly to the court when you file. The fees vary in each state vary depending on where you live.  You can find out by contacting your county clerk’s office.

If you are able to agree on these items, it’s possible to save yourself lots of money in legal fees.  If you cannot agree, we suggest you seek legal advice.

Divorce is usually a very trying time, but if you and your spouse have agreed to all matters in regards to ending your marriage, this kit will definitely save time, heartache and hundreds of dollars.  Be sure to go over all situations, even real estate and children.  In addition to the cost of the kit, you will need to pay court fees.  These vary from state to state, even county to county.  You pay these fees directly to the court.  You can contact your county clerks’ office for actual fees.

To begin this low-cost downloadable specific state divorce process, please go to www.mydivorcedocuments.com and see what we have to offer you now.

Common Questions of a Divorce!

A divorce is when both husband and wife have decided to separate and go there own way.  This usually takes the form of dividing their previously shared assets between them selves.  Some divorce proceedings become legal disputes over money, property, and child custodial rights.  When a couple cannot reach an agreement, the court will ultimately make those decisions for them, taking a wide range of factors in consideration when concluding a judgment.

In some states, divorce was socially shameful, and was highly discouraged or prevented by the Church and state.  Divorce was only allowed if one party broke certain marital obligations like, adultery, neglect or abuse.  Such marriages are now referred to as a “fault divorce”.   More recently, divorce has returned to its more usual state, by becoming legal, acceptable, and fairly common.  Some statisticians have reported that fewer than one in twenty divorces are contested in a courtroom.  Divorcing couples are usually reaching a settlement either with lawyers, mediation, or privately.  The restrictions on how easily a divorce can be obtained have been significantly lifted with the prevalence of the “no fault” divorce.

A no-fault divorce is a statement by each spouse that their petition to the court for a divorce has been mutually agreed on by both parties.  It attempts to hold neither party responsible for the dissolution of the marriage, and usually, couples reach a settlement over the division of rights and property.  In this case it would be bound by either an agreement between each other or mediation to avoid litigation.  In most states, all divorces require that a reason be given for the state to dissolve the marriage.  With the exception of the no-fault divorce, acceptable reasons include incompatibility between spouses, the existence of irreconcilable differences, or even the most practical description of a breakdown of the marriage.  The property is not necessarily equal in a no-fault divorce, subject to the agreed terms of the divorce, or ruling of the court.

A Summary Divorce in the United States, and some other countries, is the fastest and simplest form of divorce, granted to couples who had a short, inconsequential marriage.  In this case, few shared assets, and an equally low value of private assets.  It is also conditional on there being no child custodial issues, and no home or mortgage.

Commonly cited causes of divorce include:

  • Adultery by either one or both spouses
  • Strains caused by in-law family members
  • Physical and emotional abuse
  • Obsessive compulsions and addictions

It is a commonly held belief that women successfully negotiate the more favorable settlement or judgment more often than men in divorces, and this is actually supported by some surveys.  There is no question that mothers are usually granted the greater portion of custodial time over children compared to fathers.  However, the degree to which this happens has been gradually deceasing during the past decade.

The sharing of parental responsibilities and rights is one of the most important aspects of divorce in general.  These arrangements are always checked and ratified by a court, even where both parents are in agreement.  The ruling of custodial rights is always in favor of the child’s best interest.  In such a legal battle, the court can take a wide number of factors into consideration when deciding how to divide child custody.

With that in mind divorce rates are the highest they’ve been for hundreds of years.  The terms of divorce are becoming more manageable and acceptable to all involved.

On that note if you would like to begin your process of a divorce.  Simply go to www.mydivorcedocuments.com and purchase your do-it-yourself specific state divorce kit and begin your process today.

Steps for Filing for Divorce


Every state has a specific process to get a divorce.

Some states prefer to use the terms “dissolution of marriage”, rather then the word “divorce”.  Although relatively the same definition.  Below are a few steps to filing a divorce.

First Step: Communicating with your Spouse

An irate bitter divorce will only lead to a longer and more expensive one.  If you and your spouse are able to come to an agreement between the division of your marital property and the custody of any children, the divorce will be less difficult then those matters in a dispute.  Majority of couples are not fortunate enough to go into an “uncontested divorce”, and will have to go through the “contested divorce” proceedings in the courtroom.

Second Step: Discussing the Division of your Assets and Property

Each individual state will divide both parties property obtaining during their marriage.  Every state allows each party to determine how the property should be split.  If the two cannot come to an agreement, the judge will then split the property.  Most states have either “community property” or “equitable distribution” divisions.  In community property states the marital property and assets will be divided equally.  A court does not have the authority to base off of income, wealth or other contribution to the marriage.  In an equitable distribution state, a spouse is entitled to a portion of the marital property to their contribution to the marriage.  This means both financial and non-financial elements of the marriage such as raising children and taking care of the home.

Step Three:  Consult a Lawyer

State law governs multiple items related to a divorcing couple such as grounds for divorce, marital property and if a couple is legally separated for any duration of time before the divorce may be granted.

Step Four:  Know your state grounds for divorce

Some states allow a “no fault” divorce where the parties do not have to have a reason for divorce beyond irreconcilable differences.  If your state requires “fault” before the divorce can be granted, there may only be specific grounds which you are legally entitled to a divorce.  A few examples of a fault divorce are adultery, abuse etc.

Step Five: File for Legal Separation

Some states require that couples be separated for a certain amount of time before a divorce may be awarded.  Some states only require that a couple live apart from each other for a specific amount of time.  Some other states require filing a notice of the separation which the court as well.  All requirements will have to be met before a court will accept a divorce application.

Step Six: Be sure to gather all Financial Information

In a divorce the spouse’s assets and debts will be split.  When a divorce petition is filed, most states require a detailed financial data to help the judge determine child or spousal support orders if this may apply.

Step Seven: File the Petition for Divorce

If you choose to hire a lawyer, it is best you have him there representing you.  Some jurisdictions may have different forms for your divorce based on your divorce situation.  If you do not have an attorney this is the information that you most likely will be required to provide for the court:

-Present both yourself and your spouse

-Name and ages of any children that you have and current resident status

-Identify all martial property and debts and your individual income and assets.

When the petition is filed most states require the plaintiff provide three or more copies of the petition and summons.  A summons is a court requiring a party to answer a complaint and appear before the court.  The clerk will then stamp all copies and give you back two, one for yourself and one copy for you to serve on your spouse.

Step Eight: Pay the Court Costs

When a petition is filed the clerk will require that you pay the appropriate court fees.  If you are indigent you may ask the court to waive the fees, which may be included on the complaint form or may require a separate form.

Step Nine: Serve Your Spouse the Divorce Papers

The party who files a court action is responsible for serving the other parties to the lawsuit.  Serving the other party means giving them a physical copy of the petition you filed as well as the summons.  In most states you may serve the other party through the mail or by having another person serve the defendant in person.  In some jurisdictions you may pay a fee to have the Sheriff serve the opposing party for you.  Most states do not allow a plaintiff to personally serve a defendant.

Step Ten:  Provide the Court with Proof of Service

After the defendant has been served most states require the plaintiff submit a “proof of service” with the court.  In this document the person who served the defendant must attest to the service, how and when the party was served.  The proof of service may be a part of the petition or may be a separate form.

Due to divorces being complex and emotional events, most parties have an attorney represent them.  The other option would be to try a do-it-yourself divorce process.   If you decide to try this process you can begin by simply going to www.mydivorcedocuments.com and purchase your specific state down-loadable forms and kit.

Options of a Divorce!

A divorce legally suspends a marriage.  Courts in the United States at this time acknowledge two types of divorces:

1) Absolute/Fault Divorce: To obtain an absolute divorce, courts require some type of verification showing of wrongdoing on one spouse’s behalf.  An absolute divorce is an official termination of a legal marriage.

2) Limited Divorce: Limited divorces are typically referred to as a legal separation Limited divorces result in termination of the right to separate but the court refrains from officially dissolving the marriage and the parties status remain unchanged.

A limited divorce is a legal action in which the court obverse’s a couple’s separation.  It is generally used by people who

  • Do not have any grounds of an absolute divorce
  • Need financial relief
  • Unable to settle their differences privately

During a limited divorce, the parties are to reside separately.  However, they remain legally married.

  • Although the parties are still married, neither has the right to have sexual relations with the other spouse.
  • In addition, neither spouse may remarry, nor have sexual relations with another person.  If so, this is considered adultery.
  • The court determines which party is at fault, if either, is at fault.  The court may grant support to one spouse based on need.
  • The limited divorce can also resolve questions of:
  • child custody
  • child support
  • health insurance coverage
  • dividing of personal property & assets

If spousal support is not required, and there is no property to divide, there is generally no need for a limited divorce.

If one spouse dies after a limited divorce the other spouse may still inherit property.  Also the form of ownership for any property you own as husband and wife will stay the same.

3) Conversion Divorce:

Some states permit conversion divorce.  Conversion divorce changes a legal separation into a legal divorce after both parties have been separated for a necessary amount of time.

4) No-Fault Divorce:

Many states have passed a no-fault divorce.  A no fault divorce does not require a fault or a substantial reason to divorce.  In today’s day, not all states have passed a no fault divorce.

The Court may find the following:

  • the relationship is no longer possible
  • that irreconcilable differences have caused a breakdown of the marriage
  • conflict of personalities have destroyed the legit ends of the marital relationship and prevents any reasonable possibility of reconciliation
  • Marriage is irretrievably broken

Property Division

During a divorce the court must divide the property between both spouses.  Courts today recognize two separate types of property during property division proceedings

  • Marital Property
  • Separate Property

Marital property is any property that the husband and wife obtained individually or jointly during the course of the marriage.  Separate property is any property that one spouse purchased and possessed prior to the marriage and that did not change in value during the course of the marriage.  If the separate property owning spouse trades the property for other property or sells the property, the newly obtained property or funds of the sale stay separate property.

Current Division

Current division of property strives for a reasonable division of marital assets.  By dividing the assets equitably, a judge endeavors to effect the final separation of the parties and to enable both parties to start their post-marital lives with some degree of financial status.

Most courts at least recognize the following factors:

  • Contribution to the accumulation of marital property
  • Respective parties liabilities, whether one spouse received income-producing property while the other did not
  • the duration of the marriage
  • age and health of the partners
  • the earning capacity and employability of the respective parties
  • the value of each party’s separate property
  • the pension and retirement rights of each party
  • whether one party will receive custodial and child support provisions
  • the tax consequences of the allocations
  • whether one spouse’s marital misconduct caused the divorce

Most jurisdictions also give the family court judge broad jurisdiction by providing judges with the right to consider any other just and proper factor.

When assigning property, judges cannot transfer the separate property of one spouse to another spouse without the legislature having previously passed an enabling statute. Whether such an enabling statute exists varies between jurisdictions.

Alimony

Alimony refers to payments from one spouse to the other.  A court can order one spouse to pay three different types of alimony:

  • Permanent Alimony
  • Temporary Alimony
  • Rehabilitative Alimony

Permanent alimony requires the payer to continue paying either for the rest of the payer’s life or until the spouse receiving payments remarries.  Temporary alimony requires payments over a short amount of time so that the payment receipt can stand alone once again.

Similar to temporary alimony, rehabilitative alimony requires the payer to give the recipient short-term alimony after the property division proceedings have ended.

Rehabilitative alimony is to help a spouse with lesser employ ability or earning capacity become adjusted to a new post-marital life.

Courts allocate alimony with the intention of permitting a spouse to maintain the standard of living to which the spouse has become accustomed.  Factors affecting whether the court awards alimony include the marriage’s length, the length of separation before divorce, the parties’ ages, the parties’ respective incomes, the parties’ future financial prospects, the health of the parties, and the parties’ respective faults in causing the marriage’s demise.

If a couple had children together while married, a court may require one spouse to pay child support to the spouse with custody, but one should note that alimony and child support are totally different.

In a nutshell, if you are certain you want a divorce you can simply start the process yourself by going to www.mydivorcedocuments.com and begin your do it yourself divorce now.